Browse Vernacular - English

b


ba’ing comm. 1coconut midrib. Eka umalah baing ta kapyaom hi basket. Go and get coconut midribs and make a basket. (sem. domains: 5.2 - Food.) 2broom made of coconut midrib. Alam nan baing ta higidam nan dola. You get the hard broom and sweep the yard. Alam nan baing ta ihigid mun nah dalan di bale. You get the hard broom and sweep the path to the house..
ba’ud 1comm. fighting cock that is tied or penned; raised purposely for recreational purposes, i.e. gambling. Em panganon nan baud. Go feed the fighting cock. (sem. domains: 1.6.1.2 - Bird.) 2trans. tie a fighting cock in order to train. Ibaud mu nan poltan. Tie the rooster for training. i‑/iN‑. 3I Direct an action toward an object. (sem. domains: 7.5.4 - Tie.) Language Of Borrowing: Ilocano.
babal’a 1comm. an infected open wound, with pus or watery discharge; ulcerated area of skin (sem. domains: 2.5.3 - Injure.) 2intrans. for some area of skin to be infected. Mumbabala nan ingan nan golang an natlok. The child’s ears that were pierced are infected. muN‑/nuN‑.
bag’a trans. 1to ask something. Ot piayag dah ama ot ibaga dan hiya hin nganney aton da. And so they called for father and they asked him what they should do. Ituluy kun ibaga tun wadah nomnom ku. I will continue to ask this that is in my mind. Waday nungkakaten mumbaga ya maid di innunan mumbaki ta iappitana dida. Someone who is dead might ask for something (be in need), then, he has no way of offering it to them. i‑/iN‑, muN‑/nuN‑. 3I Direct action toward object. Sim: kodo, pakada. (sem. domains: 3.3.2 - Request, 3.5.1.5 - Ask.) 2to tell something. Ninomnom nay imbagan amanan din hi Antonion kananay deket mabdang ke. He remembered what his late father, Antonio, told him that if it was roaming spirits. i‑/iN‑. (sem. domains: 3.5.1 - Say.) bagbaga-an infl. mamagbaga
bag’ang comm. refers to the whole neck. Andukke nan bagang di manuk. A chicken’s neck is long. Waday kimmalat hi bagang ku te makiyaki. Something bit my neck because it’s itchy. spec: tongod. (sem. domains: 2.1.1 - Head.)
bag’i trans. to cut superficially through skin of animal, vegetable, fruit. Bagiyom nan ukin di tabuyug. Cut the skin of the pomelo. ‑on/‑in‑. 4A Change the structure of object. (sem. domains: 7.8.3 - Cut.)
bag’u (sp. var. baguun) comm. a tree variety that has yellow flowers and produces small cherry-like fruit that cannot be eaten. [The wood from this tree is too soft for good firewood, but the wood is used for fence posts. Certain types of beetles feed on the leaves. When branches are cut, the tree grows new ones.] Uggek inilay kanan dah bagu. I don’t know what they call the bagu-tree. (sem. domains: 1.5.1 - Tree.)
bag’ut (sp. var. bag-ut) 1trans. to uproot; to remove something inserted in the ground. Em baguton nadan paul an nialad. You pull out the cane that have been placed as a fence. Adim baguton nan laya. Do not uproot the ginger. Binagut da nan intanom mid nakugab. They uprooted what we planted yesterday. ‑on/‑in‑. 4D Release, remove or detach object. (sem. domains: 6.2.4.2 - Uproot plants.) 2dig or uproot. 2.1trans. to dig and gather root crops. Eka mumbagut ad uwani aba. Go and gather aba (a root vegetable). muN‑/nuN‑. (sem. domains: 6.2 - Agriculture, 7.8.6 - Dig.) 2.2trans. indicates the manner in which to uproot a plant. Ibagut mun nah puuna. Uproot it by holding it at the base. i‑/iN‑. 2.3trans. encodes a partitive idea; uproot some, not all. Bumagut kah ittay an danggu. Uproot/Pull out some spring onions. ‑um‑/‑imm‑.
bagaw’ol comm. widest terrace in a field. Da nak-Dulnuan di kompayoh bagawol. The sons of Dulnuan are the owners of the field with the widest terrace. (sem. domains: 6.2.9 - Farmland.)
bak’et comm. 1old woman. Hi Matima ya baket mo. Matima is an old woman now. Baket moh inana. Her mother is now an old woman. Opp: lakay. (sem. domains: 2.6.5.2 - Woman.) 2may be used by a man to refer to his spouse. Hi baket di nana-ang. It was my wife who cooked. Daan hi baket mu? Where is your wife? Language Of Borrowing: Ilocano.
bak’ug 1sta. hunchbacked. Mabakug dah gagala nadan aammod an mungngunuh payo te iyuyuung da. Those parents who work the ricefields become hunchbacked because they are bent-over everyday. ma‑. (sem. domains: 2.1 - Body.) 2trans. to hunch the back; slouch; bent from waist. Adim bakbakuggon te ad-adin tibon. Do not hunch your back because it is not good to look at. ‑on/‑in‑ CV(C)‑. 4A Change the structure of object. (sem. domains: 7.1.8 - Bend down.)
bak’uy₁ trans. to bend something. Bakuyon da nan gulipu ta umeh baleda. They will bend the pipe so it will go to their house. Bumakuy ka nah gumok. Bend some of the iron bars. Nabakuy di gaud na. His spade is bent/crooked. ‑on/‑in‑. 4A Change the structure of object. Sim: yaku, baking, banguy, killu. (sem. domains: 7.7.4 - Press.)
bak’uy₂ trans. to serve by spoon; to spoon out. [The word may be used because of the curve of the spoon because the same word form means ‘curved/bent’.] Bakuyom din ihda. You spoon the viand. ‑on/‑in‑. 4C Convey/bring objects toward agent. Sim: ado. (sem. domains: 5.2.1.5 - Serve food.)
bal’a 1comm. breathing organ of humans, fowls and animals; lungs. Waday dogonah balana. He has sickness in his lungs. Nittok kanu tuwalih alte na ya hi bala na. They said that he had been stabbed right in the liver and lungs. (sem. domains: 2.1.8 - Internal organs.) 2sta. indicating that something is in the lungs. Nibala nan dogona. His sickness is in his lungs. mi‑/ni‑.
baladd’ong trans. to stretch across; stretchable things. Nibaladong nan ulog nah dalan. The snake was stretched across the road. i‑/iN‑, mi‑/ni‑. 3E Move an object directionally. (sem. domains: 7.3.4.7 - Extend.)
balangy’a₁ 1adj. a curved shape. Punggabut di ballangyan otak. The curved bolo is for cutting grass. Qualifier. (sem. domains: 8.3.1 - Shape.) 2comm. an iron scraper fixed diagonally in a wooden handle.
balangy’a₂ comm. lima bean. Naligat an muntanom hi balangya te bumutong. It is difficult to plant lima beans because it causes drunkeness. (sem. domains: 5.2.3.1.3 - Food from vegetables.)
balbal’a comm. mushroom variety, yellow and violet; found in decayed grasses. Tumakutak an mangihdah balbala te wadaday nakdotan. I’m afraid to eat the balbala- mushroom because some are poisonous. (sem. domains: 1.5.3 - Grass, herb, vine.)
balit’i (sp. var. balitti) comm. tree variety; big, tall tree; must be dried thoroughly before being used for firewood. Kimmayat nan littuku nah baliti. The littuku-vine climbed the baliti-tree. (sem. domains: 1.5.1 - Tree.)
balit’uk 1comm. refers to gold metal. Naligat di balituk an mahamak. It is difficult to find gold. Nabalol di balituk. Gold is precious. Eda nunminas hi balituk ad Benguet. They went to mine for gold in Benguet. (sem. domains: 1.2.2.3 - Metal.) 2intrans. to wear gold jewelry. Mumbalituk ka hin ume ka nah kasar. Wear your gold jewelry when you attend the wedding. muN‑/nuN‑. 3deriv V. made of gold. [Gold usually came from the Benguet area or earlier through trade with lowlanders or the Chinese.] Sim: gombang; gen: gum’ok. 4comm. ornaments made of or coated with gold; usually in the shape of an earring. [The traditional necklaces of gold stringed pieces are shaped like a horn and are generally worn with the pang-o agate necklace.] Waday balituk nan attake na. Her necklace has a golden ornament. Gen: gamgam. (sem. domains: 5.4.1 - Jewelry.) der. binalatuk
ban’ag comm. the result or outcome of an action or event. Nganney pumbanagan nan em kinali? What is the result of what you said? puN‑ ‑an. (sem. domains: 9.6.2.6 - Result.) Language Of Borrowing: Ilocano.
ban’o trans. to borrow something. Ekat em banhon nan ligau da. Go and borrow their winnower. Maid di ena banhan. He had no one to borrow from. Bumano kah gaud da. Borrow their long-handled spade. Maid di mabano. There is nothing that could be borrowed. ‑on/‑in‑, ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, ‑um‑, ma‑. 4C Convey/bring objects toward agent. (sem. domains: 6.8.5 - Borrow.) infl. mumbanno infl. pabanhan
ban’ong 1comm. lip of ricefield dike which contains the water; projecting edge of ricefield dike sometimes stepping stones are laid for walking on the lip. Niphod mo nan banong nan payo? Is the ricefield dike already fixed? Nun-ule-ule da te uma-agol hi Bugan an mundalan nah madanglol an banong. They walked slowly because Bugan was cautious walking on the slippery dikes. Sim: botnge. (sem. domains: 6.5.2.1 - Wall.) 2trans. to build ricefield dikes. Banongan dan nan payo ad uwani. They are going to build the ricefield dike today. Mumbanong da ama nah payon da Juan. Father and his companions are building mud dikes in the Juan’s field. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, muN‑/nuN‑. 5A Changing state of site by adding something.
ban’ug (sp. var. bannug) comm. hawk. [If it flies up higher by circling and talking, it is a dopal omen, meaning it will not rain for a long time.] Intayap nan banug nan impa. The hawk flew away with the chick. Falconiformes; Bureo Jamaicensis Sim: halagma, mangayyuding, butbut, gawwang. (sem. domains: 1.6.1.2 - Bird.)
ban’ul intrans. for firewood to burn poorly so food is not cooked well, especially in regard to rice and tubers. Mumbanul di itungu ten ugge namag-anan. Firewood burns poorly when it’s not dry. muN‑/nuN‑. 1C General class. (sem. domains: 5.5.4 - Burn.)